UX Australia 2012

When & Where

Hands-on workshops

Tue 28 - Wed 29 August 2012

Main conference

Thur 30 - Fri 31 August 2012

Where

Sofitel Brisbane Central, Brisbane, Australia

UX Australia 2012 presentations

Audio is available for the following presentations:

21.5 ways to adjust attitudes to accessibility

Ruth Ellison and Kim Chatterjee

Culture change is hard and it can take a long time. Over the last decade the understanding of how to do usability (properly) has become mainstream. We’re too impatient to wait that long for accessibility and inclusive design to become mainstream as well; after all, isn’t access a fundamental part of the user experience?

21.5 ways to adjust attitudes to accessibility - includes slides and audio

5 things everyone should know about mobile UX (10-minute talk)

Frankie Madden

Designing for mobile is challenging. I’ll discuss 5 things which everyone should be considering when they create their mobile strategy, such as “having an app isn’t everything” and “context is everything”. I’ll include some examples of mobile strategies that have been successful and some that have been failures.

5 things everyone should know about mobile UX (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

A case study on designing the Australia Post iPhone and iPad app (10-minute talk)

Kathryn Ross

I’ll explain the process of designing a 4 and a 1/2 star app. I’ll share our successes and our lessons learnt from the project.

A case study on designing the Australia Post iPhone and iPad app (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

Airtravel, a quiet revolution

Alex Williams

Air travel has been quietly transforming over the last few years. Technology is influencing all aspects of the experience, from the materials used in aircraft, dynamic cabin lighting, through to how we plan travel, check in, spend our time onboard and remain connected throughout the entire experience. During this session we’ll share innovations affecting the future of airtravel and the UX challenges in designing them – informed by practical examples from designing solutions for Qantas, Emirates and Virgin Atlantic.

Airtravel, a quiet revolution - includes slides and audio

Avoid opinionitis

Jay Rogers

It lurks everywhere, part of everyday life. And yet in most cases opinionitis has minor flareups and is forgotten. But there are certain conditions which can cause opinionitis to transmute into a deadly syndrome that sweeps all before it. And certain environments which allows opinionitis to rage unchecked. Those conditions, and that environment, is the product development team.

Avoid opinionitis - includes audio

Closing talk: The rise of the design-smart city: emergent hope in Adelaide’s 5000+

Tim Horton

Australia’s cities fuel our economy and define the quality of our urban life. But as Australia’s population ages we need a different strategy for the future. What role can design play in more integrated decision making for a more productive and human-centred city? Adelaide’s 5000+ is a national urban pilot bringing design-based thinking to public policy. Can design be used as a tool to more creatively engage people in shaping the cities we all want? Are design-based methods the key to more effective urban governance? Does Australia’s design community have a role to play?

Closing talk: The rise of the design-smart city: emergent hope in Adelaide’s 5000+ - includes audio

Combining Agile, Lean and Usability within Suncorp

Teale Shapcott

This presentation will describe how a small Project Team within Suncorp combined Agile, Lean and Usability techniques to simplify and improve online Service delivery and increase the productivity of 16,000 Suncorp employees.

Combining Agile, Lean and Usability within Suncorp - includes slides and audio

Creating a global experience language for the BBC

Bronwyn van der Merwe

After printing out key sections of bbc.co.uk onto what has now become known as the ‘Wall of Shame’, the BBC decided to embark on an ambitious project. The goal was to create a global experience language to drive consistency and coherence across the diverse, cross-platform portfolio of BBC products and services, all of which had different brands, audiences, contexts of use, and most problematically, design teams.

Creating a global experience language for the BBC - includes slides and audio

Creating a world of unique experiences (10-minute talk)

Fabian Rebeiro

Unique experiences across channels, that are bespoke to a user’s needs, goals and motivations in context, and fulfilling these with minimum user input, are the Holy Grail’s of UX. In this talk, we will explore technologies that help understand users and create engaging experiences through intelligent profiling and learned data.

Creating a world of unique experiences (10-minute talk) - includes audio

Design studio methodology: A quick why and how (10-minute talk)

Daniel Naumann

A quick introduction to the Design Studio Methodology and how I use a version of it to quickly produce wireframes while getting buy-in from the project team and stakeholders – in just a few hours.

Design studio methodology: A quick why and how (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

Designing interactions for big data in the age of insight, using the language of discovery

Joe Lamantia

The oncoming tidal wave of Big Data, with its rapidly evolving ecosystem of multi-channel information saturated environments and services, brings profound challenges and opportunities for the design of effective user experiences that UX practitioners are just beginning to engage with in a meaningful fashion.

Designing interactions for big data in the age of insight, using the language of discovery - includes slides and audio

Developers will design: Let’s make them amazing at it

Samantha Thebridge

At Atlassian, the developers outnumber the design team 25-1. We have a strong Developer on Testing initiative and a famous Developer on Support rotation. Both programs make us stronger in the areas of QA and support.

To truly become a design led organization, we asked ourselves: why not Developer on Design?

Developers will design: Let’s make them amazing at it - includes slides and audio

Doing GOMS analysis on the back of an envelope (10-minute talk)

Andrew Wight

The GOMS keystroke level model is a simple technique that allows you to quantitatively compare the efficiency of alternative designs. Its powerful, compelling and can be done in a few minutes yet most UX professionals have never heard of it. A 10 minute introduction is all you need to get started.

Doing GOMS analysis on the back of an envelope (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

Graffiti, drugs & rock ‘n roll: The importance of gatekeepers in accessing closed communities for successful experience design

Lisa Herrod

In this presentation I will be referencing recent user research I conducted within a small community of graffiti writers and street artists. Central to the presentation is the essential need for a trusted relationship with ‘gatekeepers’ for access to authentic research data.

Graffiti, drugs & rock ‘n roll: The importance of gatekeepers in accessing closed communities for successful experience design

Grassroots UX: Filling all the seats at the table

Samantha Soma

UX work can be hard enough when you have to educate external stakeholders about its value within a truncated timeframe and the constant drumbeat of innovation faster now. But what if your challenge lies within your organisation? How do you develop, much less maximise, the UX capacity of interested supporters, while also engaging those who don’t see UX as their responsibility (or worse, see it as frivolous)? The key is to use tried and proven community organising strategies to develop an internal UX community.

Grassroots UX: Filling all the seats at the table - includes audio

Great design is not the only thing that makes for successful projects and happy clients (10-minute talk)

Chris Michelle-Wells

If you’re a designer new to UX, it might seem depressing to hear you won’t automatically succeed just on your awesome design skills. However, this can be a good thing. Here’s five things I’ve learned about making successful projects and happy clients – none of them to do with good design.

Great design is not the only thing that makes for successful projects and happy clients (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

How I became authentically digital, or: what you need to know about the “Metro” design language

Shane Morris

Microsoft’s “Metro” design language first appeared on Windows phone, and has now been adapted for Xbox and Windows 8. Since its appearance it has generated a combination of praise, confusion and copious discussion among interaction designers. Is Metro a valid attempt to evolve the art of interactive products and services? Or is it a deliberate strategy to commoditise interaction design to the point where it requires less design, and less designers?

How I became authentically digital, or: what you need to know about the “Metro” design language - includes audio

How I learned not to tell clients the wrong thing at the wrong time

Walt Buchan

Has UX changed for you? Not so long ago user experience expertise was bought in for occasional projects, reporting to Sales or Marketing or Engineering. Now consultants regularly work with experienced internal UX teams, with their own methods, problems and even ideas… Complementing in-house teams isn’t always easy, there’re the mysterious journeys the team have taken, the ideas they’ve kept and those taboo decisions that must never be mentioned.

Drawing on personal experience of work with in-house teams I’ll explore projects where I’ve got it wrong and what I’ve learnt from my mistakes

How I learned not to tell clients the wrong thing at the wrong time - includes slides and audio

Immersing your client in their user’s world to get enthusiastic buy-in (10-minute talk)

Fiona Meighan

You’ve done the research and designed a fantastic user experience, but it wont go ahead until the client commits! I’ll share some techniques to help you connect your clients deeply with their users to advocate for your user centred designs, recommendations and innovative ideas.

Immersing your client in their user’s world to get enthusiastic buy-in (10-minute talk) - includes audio

Innovate or die (10-minute talk)

Lucy Chen

Do you “do innovation”? Is it critical to your success? How do you turn ideas into tangible, profitable projects? I want to introduce a method we use at Vivant that was effective and efficient (and minimises meeting time). The result: an energised team, solid project proposal, and traction with the clients.

Innovate or die (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

Innovative intranets from around the globe (10-minute talk)

James Robertson

Get a glimpse inside 10 leading-edge intranets from organisations around the world. This fast paced session will share examples from a number of different industries including award winning sites from the Intranet Innovation Awards. Be able to take away award winning ideas and apply them in your organisation.

Innovative intranets from around the globe (10-minute talk) - includes audio

Is less more, or just a bore? (10-minute talk)

Justin Tauber

“I am for richness of meaning rather than clarity of meaning,” wrote Robert Venturi, father of postmodern architecture. We contemporary experience architects are devoted to the very modernist objective of intuitively satisfying user needs. Nevertheless, I’ll suggest that becoming a bit more postmodern might just be a good thing.

Is less more, or just a bore? (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

I’ll pay, just Kaching it to back me (10-minute talk)

Chris Paton

Kaching blends traditional mobile banking with NFC and social payments. CommBank allowed us to throw out the rulebook and create a fun, intuitive and trustworthy app. This quick talk will outline our concept development and testing process together with some interesting learnings from users when creating this innovative banking app.

I’ll pay, just Kaching it to back me (10-minute talk) - includes audio

Keynote: The power of “Why?”

Bill DeRouchey

Designers must continually learn to survive. New technologies, new philosophies, new roles and responsibilities, new tools and methods all keep designers on their toes throughout their career. But one skill persists no matter where designer find themselves, the ability to ask Why?

Asking customers why they do what they do or believe what they believe unlocks the foundation for inspired design. Asking organizations why they follow their strategies unearths good habits or dangerous ruts. Asking our most traditional institutions why things are the way they are uncovers the potential to remake our society. Constraints, myths, assumptions and perspectives can all melt with a well-timed and well-framed Why?

Let’s apply some toddler magic to our adult careers and ask Why?

Keynote: The power of “Why?” - includes slides and audio

Learnings and unlearnings: a (re)discovery of simplicity through ‘fuzzy balls’ (10-minute talk)

Maria Salas

You can’t learn what you already know. In an epic quest to truly uncover customer innovation I share learnings and unlearnings from the early stage of our iPad app project. Goal 1: Unlearn complexity; Goal 2: Relearn simplicity. Why? To deliver on true business innovation – the one that is for the customer.

Learnings and unlearnings: a (re)discovery of simplicity through ‘fuzzy balls’ (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

Memento mori: Remember your mortality

Joji Mori

Life brings with it many uncertainties. That we all die, however, is not negotiable. As technology creeps into more aspects of our personal lives, we must begin to consider what death means for the interactive technologies that we design and build. For example, have you ever considered what should happen to all your saved emails after you die? Whether you are designing banking systems, attempting to grow an online community, or building an online store for a retailer, there is no escaping human mortality. In this talk, I ask the audience to consider death and its impact on such interactive technologies.

Memento mori: Remember your mortality - includes slides and audio

Mindful designs: Practical tips for designing for cognitive & learning difficulties

Ruth Ellison

As UX designers, do we really know our audiences, and do we fully appreciate how some might experience things differently to others? What are we doing to design for the broad range of experiences and abilities of our users?

Mindful designs: Practical tips for designing for cognitive & learning difficulties - includes slides and audio

Oh the humanity

Tref Gare

When tooling around with all the technological toys, tricks and trinkets at our command there is a constant danger of losing sight of the common core of the matter – the humans in the mix. However in this case I’m not talking about users. I’m talking about you – the designers, developers, product managers and well, yes… ok the users as well. Can’t forget them now can we. Can we?

My basic premise is that it doesn’t matter what process you use or what flavour you are. What matters is the people you have and how they play together.

Oh the humanity - includes audio

Performing design: Taking the stage and acting a role

Jeremy Yuille

Designers use many different techniques and methods, but they are all eventually performed. Whether it’s a workshop, pitch, interview or even a report, we take on a role and play it. Design is a performance, and I want to talk about different approaches to performing design.

Performing design: Taking the stage and acting a role - includes audio

Positive design (10-minute talk)

Renato Feijó

Current UX approaches are based on problem finding and solving. The focus on dysfunctions contributes to sapped morale, political games and decision paralysis in multidisciplinary teams. Positive Design is an alternative strength-based method which promotes positive change and innovation through human-centric cooperation and collaboration across organisational boundaries.

Positive design (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

Potholes on the journey to design transparency

Jake Causby

This talk is about the journey from ‘secret design business’ to ‘design transparency’. It’s my own journey at Atlassian, relevant to anyone who is on, or about to embark upon, a similar journey. Industry leaders paint a picture of how things should be, and that’s great, but I’ve always had trouble bridging the gap. HOW do I get there? What do I do first? They make collaboration and design processes seem simple, but the truth is they’re hard. You may need to change both your own, and your team’s habits. This talk aims at bridging the gap by learning through some of my wins and even more importantly, my failures.

Potholes on the journey to design transparency - includes slides and audio

Real world user experience or when channel finally dies

Harriet Wakelam and Jessica Ukotic

This talk describes a project to test the new NAB retail store design and how it became a catalyst for increasing the respect and strategic use of experience design in a large organisation.

Real world user experience or when channel finally dies - includes slides and audio

Share Share Share – Do users really care? (10-minute talk)

Tania Lang

We have seen a proliferation of sites lately adding social networking buttons to every page of their website. But do users want to share your website with their friends and if so, how do they want to do this? I will share some of our recent usability test findings.

Share Share Share – Do users really care? (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

Shit UXers (would like to) say (10-minute talk)

Diana Runkle

Following the trend of ‘Shit [insert possessive pronoun here] say,’ the UX team at Boomworks have put together a short presentation of actual user & client quotes, which will be interlaced with what we would have liked to say in response.

Shit UXers (would like to) say (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

Six degrees of space and design

Judd Garratt and Jurgen Spangl

What does your office look like? Is it a big space or a small space? Open plan or partitioned? Have you ever thought about the influence of space on your design work? We’ve been experimenting with space and time constraints to explore new ways of interacting with our environment to produce awesome designs and get stuff done.

Six degrees of space and design - includes audio

Sources of innovation: how context and empathy drive innovation

Steve Baty

Designers research people to understand their needs, challenges, and the environments through which they navigate their day-to-day lives. By working through our observations in particular ways and questioning the insights we derive with a focus on key areas, we increase our chances of conceptualising and realising breakthrough ideas.

Sources of innovation: how context and empathy drive innovation - includes audio

Street to street guerrilla action (10-minute talk)

Martin Bullmer

Sometimes testing your designs in the lab just isn’t going to cut it. Get out on the streets and test! I’ll share 30+ tips for testing on the streets, cafes and shops. Find out why chocolate is the ultimate lure, why women trump men and why cardboard is your new best friend.

Street to street guerrilla action (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

The comparative context

Michelle Berryman

This presentation will explore how we map the phases of the customer journey against specific areas of inquiry related to customer needs and then apply this framework to a review of competitive and comparative brand experiences. The outcomes of this analysis deliver both qualitative and quantitative results that inspire our clients and us. In turn, the insights gained enable our design team to deliver far more compelling experiences.

The comparative context - includes slides and audio

The design anthropologist’s mindset

Stephen Cox

What does it mean to be human? How can an understanding of what humans are, have been and could be, mean to a designer? How do you begin to access a more meaningful world, for you as a designer and the people you are designing for? Taking an Anthropologist’s mindset allows us to glimpse the beauty of what it means to be human. How we as designers can create objects, interactions and services not just to meet needs, but to meaningfully grow the people who interact with our work, be they customers, colleagues or our future selves.

The design anthropologist’s mindset - includes slides and audio

The hardest soft skills (10-minute talk)

Mia Northrop

Soft skills are the interpersonal, communication and behavioral skills that can make or break a UX practitioner. Sure you can prototype and card sort, but how are you at selling ideas, negotiation and constructive criticism? This talk explores what soft skills are most useful, and hardest to master, for UXers.

The hardest soft skills (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

The Plimsoll Line and ideas over technology (10-minute talk)

Tristan Cooke

100 years ago ships in England were being sunk for money. Hundreds of people were dying. Enter Samuel Plimsoll; champion of the common man.  His mark, a painted circle with a line through it, persists on ships today. Showing that idea driven solutions, that solve problems, outlast technologically driven ones.

The Plimsoll Line and ideas over technology (10-minute talk) - includes slides and audio

Three’s company: A proven model for good development

Uday Gajendar

This presentation highlights our beloved ’3-in-a-box’ model that we have introduced at Citrix, a 20+ year old enterprise software company, to foster cross-disciplinary partnership and thus, innovation. Our model represents a pressure cooker, that forces 3 core domains of Engineering, Product Management, and User Experience to bond closely from end-to-end on a project to final delivery in a very tightly communicative and collaborative manner.

Three’s company: A proven model for good development - includes audio

Understanding change aversion and how to design for it

Aaron Sedley and Hendrik Müller

Change aversion is a natural response, which technology often exacerbates. Evolutionary changes can be subtle and occur over many generations. But Internet users must sometimes deal with sudden, significant product changes in applications they rely on and identify with. Despite the best intentions of designers and product managers, users often experience anxiety and confusion when faced with a new interface or changed functionality. While some change aversion is often inevitable, it can also be managed and minimised with the right steps.

Understanding change aversion and how to design for it - includes slides and audio