Design with soul: Battling the e-commerce blues

There are literally hundreds of techniques available to UX practitioners – but which techniques are the most effective? We all have our favourites, but how do you know if you’ve chosen the right combination for your project?

We chose to answer this question by tackling a project where time was largely a non-issue – not a Mickey Mouse personal project, but a real ecommerce redesign project for a real client: the Mathematical Association of Victoria’s online bookstore. We managed the client’s expectations on timeframes to allow us to apply every technique in the UX toolkit. So began our quest to determine, once and for all, which UX technique was most valuable.

In this presentation we discuss the learnings from the project, framed with numerous references to the 1980 classic musical comedy, The Blues Brothers.

There will be song and dance; there will be laughter; there may or may not be a cameo appearance from Aretha Franklin.

We’ll use examples from our project to tackle questions such as:

  • How should I choose between UX techniques when planning a project?
  • How does one triangulate qualitative and quantitative data?
  • Which one of the UX Brothers spent time in the clink?

Simon Pryor, the CEO of the MAV, will also share his thoughts on user-centred design, which techniques he found valuable, and what it’s like dealing with freelancers who request outrageous timeframes and insist on always showing up to work wearing black suits and sunglasses.

Warning: in the spirit of the famous interactive screenings once held at the Valhalla Cinema, we’ll be taking audience participation to a whole new level as we reveal our approach to designing an ecommerce solution with soul.

Presentation audio

Presentation

Sketchnotes

Design with soul: Battling the e-commerce blues
Design with Soul - Matt Magain & Luke Chambers

Photos

Matthew Magain
Luke Chambers
Aretha ? Franklin
Simon Pryor
The Blues Brothers
Aretha Franklin with the Blues Brothers
Luke Chambers
Matt Magain
A little interaction